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Day 4  Summit Day  June 27, 2000
The night prior to our summit attempt had remained cloudy; and we had heavy rain from about midnight to 1:00 AM.  We left our base camp at 3:00 AM on June 27th and headed for the North end of Upper Titcomb Lake and up Dinwoody Pass.  As we climbed the pass, and the sky lightened with daylight approaching (at 5:30 AM), we could see a cloud ceiling at about 12,500'.  The previous night's storm had dropped about 2" of new snow.
Itinerary for Summit Day  Jun 27
Miles Elevation
17.5  10,600   Upper Titcomb Lake Base Camp     3:00 AM
20.0  13,000   Dinwoody Pass                    6:00 AM
21.0  11,600   Dinwoody Glacier (lowest point)  8:00 AM
22.0  12,000   Lower Goosneck Glacier          10:30 AM
25.5  12,500   Top of Gooseneck Pinnacle ridge  1:00 PM
25.7  13,804   Gannett Peak Summit              3:00 PM
      11,600   Dinwoody Glacier (lowest point)  6:00 PM
      13,000   Dinwoody Pass                    7:30 PM
      10,600   Base Camp                        9:00 PM
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As we looked back down the pass, we had a good view of the clouds above and the Titcomb Lakes.
We reached the top of Dinwoody Pass at 6:00 AM.  Visibility was about 100'. . . our long-anticipated view of Gannett Peak would have to wait.  We knew the way, so we proceeded down to Dinwoody Glacier.
We knew we had to go down and around the rock outcropping at the base of Mt. Woodrow Wilson and then cross over to Gooseneck Glacier. We crossed the lower part of Gooseneck Ridge at the horizontal snow finger at the left center of the picture above (at arrows >>>).  That proved to be the easiest route over to Gooseneck Glacier. . .
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Dan and Jim heading down Dinwoody Pass
In the picture below, we are above Gooseneck Glacier near the rocks above Gooseneck Pinnacle.  Dan is above, near the rocks, followed by Jim. The summit snow area is above, and the rocks at the summit are visible near top center of the photo.
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Because of the cloud cover since the previous evening, the snow remained soft all night and into our summit day.  We climbed the steep Gooseneck Glacier and arrived at the bergschrund area at around 11:00 AM.  Since the snow was well-consolidated, with only a soft 6" surface layer, we used only crampons and ice axes to negotiate the glacier.  Due to the loose, soft surface snow, we had to self-arrest only a few times.
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The bergschrund was partially bridged by snow, since we were there early in the season, and we had no trouble crossing it.  On the way down, however, Dan's heel punched partially through the snow bridge and Jim, who was following, looked down through that small window into blackness of undetermined depth.  Jim wisely chose to move left a few feet and cross at a different spot!
Dan reached the summit at approximately 3:00 PM and watched Joel and Jim approaching across the distinctive Gannett Peak snow cap.  They were pretending they had adult supervision and were staying away from that West edge (that's a big first step off to the West!).
Joel and Dan at 13,804 feet at 3:00 PM.  The view was awesome . . . and so are WE!!
Joel and Jim at the top of Wyoming.  There was a large thunderstorm approaching from the West, so we didn't take the time to set up the tipod for a group photo. 
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Day 4  Summit Day
Day 4  Summit Day
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Near the bottom of Dinwoody Glacier, we turned the corner around this wild-looking snow formation, which is about 60' from bottom to top.  Above are Dan and Joel heading up toward the "short cut" which cuts across Gooseneck Pinnacle ridge to Gooseneck Glacier.
A view South from the summit of Gannett Peak!  Dinwoody Pass is way down there (toward the right in the picture) with Fremont Peak behind and to the right from the Pass.
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While we were on the summit, a  serious storm continued to approach from the West.  We could see lightning in the storm and hear the thunder.  After 10 minutes, we headed down toward the rocky ridge above Gooseneck Pinnacle.  When the storm hit, we huddled down in the rock area, but the rocks were not much protection from the snow squall.  The storm only lasted a few minutes, however, and then perfect weather returned for our descent.
We retraced our route down on our way down from the summit.  Because the snow was well-consolidated, and because there was a loose top layer of snow a few inches thick, we were able to safely glissade down much of Gooseneck Glacier (and later down the South side of Dinwoody Pass).  Due to the late hour and the soft layer of snow, many of our steps down started small avalanches, obliterating our earlier tracks.  The small avalanches made our sliding easier and quicker, however (and a lot more exciting!).
We reached the top of Dinwoody Pass at 7:30 PM and were back at our camp at 9:00 PM, tired and happy.  It didn't take us long to crash for the night, though, after an 18-hour summit day!


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